PERSPECTIVE STOOL

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Project Brief

Inspired by Enzo Mari's 'Autoprogettazione', the perspective stool was created following the rules of repetition for design creation.

A project undertaken during Trisha's exchange program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Department of Architecture and Planning, the Perspective Stool is created by repeating hollowed out rectangles constructed by butt-joining planks of 1/2 soft wood followed by arranging said rectangles in centripetal pattern, which too, results from a set of repetitive rules.

 Its special characteristic- it appears of a different color and dimension from opposite directions- making the perspective it is seen from the key ingredient to its overall appearance. 

Designed, Constructed and Painted by Trisha Mehta, the Perspective Stool will soon be joined by a complimentary set of table, ottoman and stands to create the Perspective family. 

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Inspiration Board

While the primary inspiration for the making process of the perspective stool is the work of Enzo Mari and his easy-to-=assemble simple chair, I wished to create a structural pattern with my stool that would be easy to assemble, easy to replicate through a simple set of instructions.

Thus, I sought to look for inspiration in patterns with repetitive elements that follow a process of expansion through repitition.

Ideation & Iteration

The first round of ideation involved rudimentary sketches that would outline different structures the seating furniture (chair/ stool) could be assembled as. 

The aesthetic appeal, the simpleness of the form, and the stability of the seating is what was primarily taken into account while executing the action of expanding in size and repeating to create complex patterns and structures. 

Following this exercise, the chosen idea was repurposed in varying iterations to show its pattern and assembly methods.

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Design variations of the chosen concept as repetitive patterns.

Iterations
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Physical scaled-down prototypes and 3D 

Prototyping
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